Charities should care about mobile marketing


Charities should act fast and raise money through mobile marketing. According to Devin Anderson, mobile advertising executive at Google, people will buy more mobile devices than desktops as early as 2013. This holiday, “more people will walk out with a mobile device than a notebook,” he said.

Searches using mobile devices are increasing eight times faster than those  from a personal computer. Anderson suggested the following tips at a meeting organized recently by  AZIMA:

  1.  Mobilize your Web presence: A mobile presence is the newest storefront. Web retailers using mobile storefronts are reporting an 85% surge in consumer engagement.
  2. Set up mobile specific campaigns: Mobile specific campaigns yield higher click through rates. Keep consistent messages.
  3. Think local: One in three mobile searches is local. Nearly 61% called businesses from mobile sites. Google predicts 44% of last-minute searches and store locator terms to come from mobile devices this holiday season.
  4. Use mobile unique ad formats: Drive local and in-store traffic using mobile only ad formats.
  5. Users care about mobile sites: Impatient users will punish poorly designed mobile sites. 61% are unlikely to return if they had trouble, 40% will visit a competitor’s site while 19% will navigate away from the site.
  6. Track and optimize mobile presence

How does this relate to fundraising? Prospects will donate to their favorite causes from their palms. Good charities that design content for thumbs, not mice will thrive. Simple layouts that highlight  impact will attract prospects. Those who don’t will raise less money.

Search and thou shalt find!


It was interesting listening to Vanessa Fox talk about search, the primary way to navigate the Web. Fox, an expert on this topic wants all of us to solve the searcher’s problem. This is not an easy task as we think differently, confuse ourselves online and sometimes get lost that we need to search ourselves!

We are all lazy, ogle the left side of the page and graphics attract us more than lumps of text. With this common data, why do we still design Web sites that don’t deliver? I think a lot of how we define search depends on the context. In short, we  try to have a semblance of objectivity in a totally subjective topic.

Fox urges us to find out what our audience is looking for and what attracts them to the site. She eloquently said that search is about simplicity and conciseness. Two things we forget amid screaming headlines and overpowering graphics. I personally think the absence of limited space on Web sites unleashes abundant creativity that at times gets confusing.

As we think of search, we may want to focus our efforts on finding out what I call the switch rate. How much times does the user use a particular search term and elect to use another if the earlier one fails. This world of search is mysterious and sometimes confusing but smart designers will think of the commonality that binds us as  human beings. So, let’s exploit our laziness using clever headlines, and keywords that get the maximum out of minimal effort, and keep searching.

Search and thou shalt find!